Tag Archives: bug

jQuery document ready bug in Safari / WebKit

There is an issue with the jQuery 1.3.2 document ready function in WebKit based browsers that which can cause numerous problems if you are manipulating the DOM, in my situation getting the width / height of an element.

Using the .width() and .height() methods were working fine in every other browser but Safari, which I thought was a little bit odd. After trying to come up with an alternative method of coding calculating the heights and comparing them in FireBug and Web Inspector, I set about Googling the problem. Continue reading

CSS Opacity in Opera using jQuery

Whilst attempting to cross browser test a jQuery plug-in that I’m currently working on, I noticed that my opacity settings were being ignored in my current version of Opera (9.23).

$("#id").css({opacity: 0.8});

It turns out that the latest version of jQuery (1.3.1) doesn’t believe that Opera 9.2 supports CSS opacity, and therefore it is ignored completely. Continue reading

CSS: Extra Button Padding in IE

Today at work I was asked how to remove the extra padding added to buttons (both the button tag and input[type=button]) in Internet Explorer.

The Problem:

In the example below there is a standard button with 10px padding on all sides. Internet explorer chooses to add additional horizontal padding:

The solution:

After coming across this problem myself in the past, I eventually remembered that there are two CSS styles you can add to fix this bug feature in IE:

button {
	width: auto;
	overflow: visible;
}

JS submit is not a function

Today I was asked by a colleague to aid them with adding functionality to a form that would allow it to be submitted by pressing ‘ctr + s’ keys.

As a group of web developers this key combination is something that comes almost naturally to us when editing and constantly saving code, so should prove a useful addition to the form that is not too difficult to implement.

I began by setting up the event observers to watch for the two required keys to be pressed.

Once the required key codes ( 17 and 83 ) were captured it should have been a case of simply referencing the form and applying the submit method.

document.forms['form_id'].submit();

To see if what was written so far would actually perform the desired action we tested the page using our default browser Firefox, only to discover we were receiving the following error:

document.forms.form_id.submit is not a function

This was all very puzzling but eventually resorting to a search on Google provided a number of answers.

It turns out that all our problems came back to the fact that the submit button on the form had been given the name of ‘submit’ – which is a JavaScript reserved word – resulting in ambiguity in the browser and therefore no longer referencing the method.

The solution to this is a very simple one – renaming the submit button to anything other than ‘submit’ or any of the reserved words in JavaScript.